General Wage & Hour Law News & Updates

We are seeing states start to re-open and businesses start to come back to life and bring their employees back. There are many difficult economic issues that surround these developments, not the least of which is the continuing need to comply with the Fair Labor Standards Act (and state wage and hour laws). These issues

Well, here we are, still in the midst of this horrible COVID-19 pandemic, staying home, scared to go out, wearing masks and gloves, but yet, the first lawsuit(s) involving virus issues have already been filed. In this instance, right in my home state of New Jersey, a hair stylist has filed a class and collective

The USDOL has been quite busy lately in issuing regulations and other guidance relating to the provisions in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. With that said, the “regular” business of the agency continues as best as it can. One of these functions is the issuance of Opinion Letters which, as I have written about

I am getting deluged with inquiries from clients, some very agitated, about what they should do, or can do, vis-à-vis their non-exempt work forces and how these folks can be properly paid, but at the same time remain compliant with the Fair Labor Standards Act. As a basic premise, employees must receive at least the

The Corona Virus scare is causing employers to lay people off and reduce their hours. For non-exempt, hourly people this is fairly easy, from a legal perspective, because if non-exempt people do not work, they do not get paid. The case is tougher for exempt workers. The FLSA requires employers to pay exempt employees at

What gets a lot of employers into trouble is the failure to keep accurate records. Or worse, the actual falsification of records or knowingly keeping and maintaining inaccurate records. Nothing will cause the DOL to come down harder on an employer and for the courts to back up the agency. A recent example of this

The significance of the issue of independent contractor cannot be underestimated these days and this battle is being waged on any number of fronts, including when an entity may or may not enter a litigation as an intervener.  In a recent case, a New Jersey real estate trade association has been denied to enter an

As you know, I am a big believer in and proponent of using USDOL Opinion Letters, both in advising clients, understanding the agency’s view, and, more importantly, urging them on courts as good authority for the premise I may be arguing.  Well, the fact that a federal court has just refused to accept the agency’s

The USDOL has finalized its new rule concerning when two entities can be deemed a joint employer and therefore liable for each other’s wage violations.  Under the Obama administration, the DOL sought to expand the reach of this doctrine and issued a “white paper” asserting that indicated that businesses had to be completely “disassociated” to