Accurate records are extremely important for employers. The employer must record the employees’ start time, when they took lunch, and when they leave at the end of the day.  That is so employees can be properly paid (for overtime as well) and, significantly, it is for the employer’s protection so workers cannot inflate claims of

Most wage-hour class actions settle, usually with the lead plaintiff getting an extra sum of money for leading the “good fight.” In any such action, the Judge has to approve the settlement. Well, sometimes a Judge does not like what is in the settlement and will reject it. That is exactly what has happened in

Corinne Burzichelli writes:

The issue of the exempt status of financial services employees has been explored in numerous cases for many years and in different parts of the country.  Now, there is a new chapter to add to this saga.  On February 28, 2017, Judge William J. Martini granted Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC’s motion

  • Corporate travel spend is at great risk for non-compliance if business travelers make independent decisions about airlines, hotels and rental cars. In fact, companies that have a very loose travel policy, or no formal policy often end up with endlessly escalating travel expenses. Yet, preparing, approving and gaining travel policy support can be a daunting

This week’s snow “storm” left two questions unanswered for most people: (1) where was the snow? and (2) did I have to use a PTO day during Tuesday’s state-of-emergency?

We encourage employers to carefully handle this issue, as it can become confusing and complicated.  First, the answer depends on whether the employees are exempt or

Employers often have questions relating to basic wage and hour issues.  This blog post is designed to refresh your memory as to the current status of some of your more basic wage and hour issues in New Jersey as we wrap up 2014.

Q1. What is New Jersey’s minimum wage?

A. Effective January 1, 2014,

Off-the-clock work is a common issue that often is the basis for class action wage claims.  Put simply, federal and state laws require that workers get paid for the time they “work.”  Generally, hours worked includes all time an employee must be on duty, or on the employer’s premises or at any other prescribed place