This is an interesting case.  A class action that was denied certification, appealed to the Second Circuit, which reversed because the lower court did not properly interpret the job description on the key issue of duties qualifying for the employer to claim the protection of the Part 541 exemptions.  The employees were salesmen and installation

The Fair Labor Standards Act is eighty years old this month and commentators strongly suggest that the law needs updating in many areas.

 cupcake with sparkler against a blue background, illustrating birthday conceptMy colleague Tammy McCutchen stated that a complaint-driven mechanism defense should be engrafted into the FLSA. She stated that “I think employers should get the opportunity to avoid [some liability] by having

A group of hourly employees working for the pawnshop chain Gem Financial Services Inc. have been granted conditional certification in a Fair Labor Standards Act action; their allegation is (as usual) unpaid overtime.  The federal Judge ruled that the workers had presented sufficient evidence at this early juncture to show that a common compensation policy

Whenever a class action is defended, the main defense is, always, too much individual scrutiny is needed to allow a class to be formed.  This is exactly what a group of defendants has just now urged a California federal court to find and thus decertify a conditional class of workers claiming they were denied overtime

Although there are FLSA actions brought all over the country, the statistics show that the Southern District of Florida is the (dubious) leader in such suits.  Commentators attribute this disproportionate number to the “pervasive” existence of unsophisticated small businesses employing immigrant workers and, importantly, a skilled and aggressive plaintiffs’ bar that are knowledgeable in FLSA

There is, as we all know, an insane amount of litigation on independent contractor issues.  These controversies can emanate from any industry and there is no business that is immune to these allegations.  Case in point.  A judge in New York State has just granted class certification to a class of cheerleaders for the

No industry or business is immune from the threat of a FLSA class action.  Proof of this premise is found in the certification of a class of dozens of freelance content producers who allege that the parent entity of the Hollywood Reporter denied them overtime by misclassifying the workers as independent contractors.  The primary allegation