The issue of misclassification of workers as exempt when they might not be has been around for a very long time. Another class of such workers has been certified in the health care industry. The federal Judge has granted final certification to two classes of workers claiming they are entitled to overtime. The classes will

I have written a few times on the new, very aggressive, enforcement measures that the New Jersey legislature has recently taken on the issue of misclassification. On this troubling note, I just read an article where other management-side employment law attorneys also recognize that these so-called workplace protection laws can do tremendous damage to their

I read an interesting post in the Seyfarth Shaw blog about out-of-state employees and their ability to become part of a FLSA collective/class action. The FLSA allows individuals to bring suits claims for overtime violations “for and in behalf of’ themselves and other “similarly situated” employees. Often, in these cases, there are but a few

The New York City restaurant industry has, over the last several years, been hit with a flood of lawsuits. Many of these have focused on illegal tip pools but many have also alleged that employees were misclassified as exempt. These cases often generate large liabilities for employers and must be avoided. A recent example of

This is an interesting and rather unique situation. Two lawyers who represent a putative class of workers who filed a class action under the Fair Labor Standards Act now want to withdraw from the case. They assert that they have had no contact with their clients, the named plaintiffs, for many weeks. The workers are

The issue of payment (or not) for undergoing security checks has been a hot item of late, especially since the US Supreme Court issued its momentous decision in Integrity Staffing Solutions v. Busk. Now, these controversies have taken on a new tweak with COVID-related screenings. In a recent case, a group of workers are

I have often blogged about the very enforcement-oriented stance of the Murphy Administration and the New Jersey Department of Labor (“NJDOL”). Well, I have now even more evidence. On July 8, 2021, Governor Murphy signed three bills into law that broaden the agency’s power to enforce State wage, benefit, and tax laws.

The first law,

In July 2019, the New Jersey Legislature amended and expanded the State’s wage-hour laws to give the enforcing agency the power to stop an errant contractor, especially those doing prevailing wage work, from actually doing any more work until the violations are remedied. In its first exercise of this awesome authority, the agency has directed

I have blogged many times about cases where relatively small amounts of compensation, bonus type compensation, are not included when an employer calculates the regular rate for overtime and a class action ensues. Now, this is happening with COVID-related bonuses and extra monies. A recent example is a case where a group of workers have