Often, attorneys advise clients on FLSA issues, such as exemption issues.  Then, a lawsuit ensues and the employer may want to use the defense that it relied in good faith on its attorney’s advice.  The potential problem that creates is that the plaintiffs may then seek production of the otherwise confidential communications on this issue

I have handled many cases involving the so-called commission exemption under the Fair Labor Standards Act, Section 207(i), and I can safely say that often a big stumbling block for the defendant (i.e. employer) is to show that it is in a “retail” industry. Absent that showing, the exemption will not apply, even if the

It seems that plaintiffs (and their lawyers) think that all they have to do to get conditional certification is throw up a flimsy Affidavit from the named plaintiff and the Court will hand them conditional certification, like it is giving out candy.  Fortunately, in the District of New Jersey that is not the case, as

It is fairly easy for a plaintiff to get conditional certification in a FLSA class action case, but that is not the end of the story.  The next step, much harder, is fending off the defendant’s anticipated motion to stop the class from receiving final certification.  It is even more difficult to withstand that defendant’s

Many industries and businesses are seasonal and I have been often approached with a client question to the effect of whether the client can change the exempt status of workers, depending on the season.  This occurs, for example, in the case of an employee who is the Head Coach of an athletic team for a

New USDOL Wage Hour Administrator Issues Opinion Letter Finding Paralegals Can Be Exempt: A New Day Dawning!

Under the Trump Administration, there has been a return to the issuance of Opinion Letters which I have highly applauded.  I also applaud the rather pro-employer stance that many of these Letters have reflected.  Another example of both

I blogged last week about the back and forth on the new USDOL proposed salary threshold for exempt status, at approximately $35,000 per year.  Well, the Democrats have now spoken on the issue and they propose raising the threshold to approximately $51,000 per year.  Another great divide.

The proposed law is entitled the Restoring Overtime

Now that the USDOL has established $35,000 per year as the new threshold for exempt status, several groups have already taken shots at that new salary level. The deadline for comments has ended and we will see what happens. However, worker advocate groups have assailed the rule and urged the agency to revert back to