The issue of misclassification of workers as exempt when they might not be has been around for a very long time. Another class of such workers has been certified in the health care industry. The federal Judge has granted final certification to two classes of workers claiming they are entitled to overtime. The classes will

The New York City restaurant industry has, over the last several years, been hit with a flood of lawsuits. Many of these have focused on illegal tip pools but many have also alleged that employees were misclassified as exempt. These cases often generate large liabilities for employers and must be avoided. A recent example of

I have always been interested in the Motor Carrier Act (MCA) exemption of the Fair Labor Standards Act, 29 USC 213(b)(1), especially in the doctrine of “practical continuity” which is one of the ways that interstate commerce is determined and have defended a number of cases where we had to rely on practical continuity for

Every time a plaintiff files a FLSA lawsuit, they seek a third year, one longer than the usual two year statute of limitations, claiming that the violations were “willful.”  It has become a matter of course and defendant attorneys must begin any settlement negotiations knowing that the amount claimed has been artificially inflated with a

Another exemption lawsuit has been filed.  What else is new?  This time, a group of nurses and care coordinators determine who analyze requests for coverage from health care providers have claimed they are entitled to overtime because they are non-exempt.  They have filed a collective action under the Fair Labor Standards Act.  The case is

There has been a lot of action lately from the USDOL on the issue of the Section 7(i) exemption from overtime (29 USC 207(i), the so-called commission exemption.  One of the basic requirements for an employer trying to claim this exemption is that it must be in a “retail business.”  Until May 2020, this was

In class actions there is always a named plaintiff (or two or three, etc).  That person acts as the class representative and is the “flagship” for the entire case.  When that individual does something to jeopardize their status as such a “representative,” the entire case might go away.  That is precisely what happened in a

Often, attorneys advise clients on FLSA issues, such as exemption issues.  Then, a lawsuit ensues and the employer may want to use the defense that it relied in good faith on its attorney’s advice.  The potential problem that creates is that the plaintiffs may then seek production of the otherwise confidential communications on this issue