Federal Wage & Hour Laws and Policy

I read an interesting post in the Seyfarth Shaw blog about out-of-state employees and their ability to become part of a FLSA collective/class action. The FLSA allows individuals to bring suits claims for overtime violations “for and in behalf of’ themselves and other “similarly situated” employees. Often, in these cases, there are but a few

This is an interesting and rather unique situation. Two lawyers who represent a putative class of workers who filed a class action under the Fair Labor Standards Act now want to withdraw from the case. They assert that they have had no contact with their clients, the named plaintiffs, for many weeks. The workers are

The issue of payment (or not) for undergoing security checks has been a hot item of late, especially since the US Supreme Court issued its momentous decision in Integrity Staffing Solutions v. Busk. Now, these controversies have taken on a new tweak with COVID-related screenings. In a recent case, a group of workers are

I have blogged many times about cases where relatively small amounts of compensation, bonus type compensation, are not included when an employer calculates the regular rate for overtime and a class action ensues. Now, this is happening with COVID-related bonuses and extra monies. A recent example is a case where a group of workers have

One tactic to defeat a class action is to assert that the named plaintiff is not an appropriate or proper representative for the class. These initiatives are not often successful, but defense counsel should always be looking for them. A defendant employer is doing just that by asserting that a lead plaintiff does not share

On prevailing wage projects, employees are paid for the different trade work they do by the rate for that trade.  Sometimes, employees work in more than one classification (e.g. Carpenter and Laborer).  These lines of demarcations are tricky sometimes, especially in situations where work in one trade might follow closely on the work of another. 

I have often said that the USDOL is a politically charged industry and its view on legal issues (much like the National Labor Relations Board) shifts with the Administration that is in power.  For example, under the prior administration, the agency took a pro-business stance and issued pro-business Opinion Letters on independent contractor and working

I have settled numerous FLSA cases and note that there are many elements that management-side lawyers always want to see in such a document.  One is a confidentiality provision as we do not want the employee “shooting his mouth off” over what he received in settlement.  We also want as broad a Release as possible

I have been praising the Opinion Letters which have, of late, been issuing from the US Department of Labor because, candidly, they are displaying a business friendly attitude, or should I say, a pragmatic approach to the thorny issues employers face in the maze of USDOL regulations.  Well, this may all change as President Biden

In FLSA cases, plaintiff lawyers are always looking for a deep pocket and one of the avenues they use towards this “goal” is the joint employer doctrine.  That doctrine allows more than one employer to be liable for employee damages (e.g. overtime, back wages) if the employers are found to co-determine employee terms and conditions