Statute of Limitations

Last year, in August, the State of New Jersey enacted the Wage Theft Act (“WTA”) which strengthened the wage hour protections for employees across the State, including expanding the statute of limitations from two years to six years.  As might be expected, almost immediately, an enterprising plaintiff lawyer sought to amend his lawsuit to extend

U.S. Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C.The legal world is abuzz with the ripples created by a recent US Supreme Court decision on the statute of limitations in class actions.  A recent post in the Epstein Becker Wage & Hour Defense Blog makes some interesting observations on the case and the issue of its application to wage-hour/overtime class actions.  The case

Whenever a class action is defended, the main defense is, always, too much individual scrutiny is needed to allow a class to be formed.  This is exactly what a group of defendants has just now urged a California federal court to find and thus decertify a conditional class of workers claiming they were denied overtime

Guess what?  Wage suits are increasing.  Hardly a surprise.  A recent study shows that wage-hour lawsuits were up about 8 percent over last year, which may stem (in part) from the recent USDOL initiatives on revising the FLSA exemption regulations and its “white paper” on independent contractor issues.  There is also the problem with applying

In FLSA collective action cases, there has been a doctrine of law prevalent for a number of years. Federal claims and state law claims are not compatible and cannot be maintained in the same lawsuit.  I have successfully moved to sever New Jersey state claims when made components of a FLSA action.  What that does