The other day I went to the eye doctor and, before I could go in, an employee checked my temperature. This phenomenon is going to become perhaps a constant fact of life when businesses open, employees return to work and employers want to be sure that they are virus-free and the workplace is safe. That

I have followed this case closely for some time,  I blogged in September that I thought the City of Chicago had positioned itself in the most favorable position, with the policies and procedures it had implemented, to win this very large class action.  It seems I was right.  The federal district court judge has ruled

I have posted numerous times about the dangers of (and the escalation of lawsuits) involving claims of off-the-clock work. Well, here we have yet another example.  A $450,000 settlement has now been approved in a case in which admissions representatives at a chain of cosmetology schools claim they were required, under an unwritten policy, to

In Maddy v General Electric Company, filed in federal court in the District of New Jersey, the plaintiffs brought a collective action pursuant to the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) to recover allegedly unpaid overtime compensation from General Electric Company (“GE”).  The theory was unpaid preliminary and postliminary work.   The plaintiffs were service technicians for

Better safe than sorry is the old adage.  Nowhere is this maxim more applicable than for an employer’s compensation practices, especially on issues of classification, working time, and record keeping protocols and obligations.

In the last several years, there has been an escalation of wage hour lawsuits, single and class action.  These cases can be